Author Archives: sysAdmin

Newsletter 87 – July 2010

Hi everyone 28/07/2010

Cant believe the last newsletter went out on 7 June just prior to my visit to Australia. I can report that it does rain on the Sunny Gold Coast, the natives are very friendly and the temperature most days hit the early 20’s – very nice.   Have just received advice that greens are non existent this week except for cabbage. So the featured vegetable this week is cabbage.   Recently Spaghetti Squash has been included in some orders so there is also some information on this unsual vegetable.

There have been several suggestions of late, that The Organic Connection would benefit from having a presence on a social media site, e.g. Facebook. Your comments would be appreciated.

Cabbage

A staple food of the rich and poor, the cultivation of cabbage goes back 4000 years. Between China and Mongolia, horsemen learned to preserve this vegetable in brine and it became the staple vegetable of the builders of the Great Wall of China in the third century BC. Later pickled cabbage arrived in Europe from the East , carried by Hun and Mongol cavalcades. The Celts may have introduced cabbage to the British Isles as early as the 4th century BC. During the Hundred years War, battles were won or lost depending on whether fresh provisions of cabbage had arrived at the soldiers’ camps. By the eighteenth century, cabbages were being loaded onto ships for long voyages. The Vitamin C helped stave off scurvy, and had other medicinal uses as Captain Cook discovered on his first voyage. When a violent storm injured 40 of his crew, the ships doctors used compresses of cabbage leaves to stave off gangrene in their wounds.

Cabbage Soup

During the weekend I made a double batch of this tasty and economical concoction, have eaten some and frozen the rest. This is really easy to make .

½ head cored and coarsely chopped cabbage
1 (15oz ) can of Italian-style diced stewed tomatoes
2 cloves of chopped garlic
2 quarts of water
4 teaspoons chicken bouillon
3 tablespoons olive oil
½ chopped onion
1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
Black pepper to taste

Add olive oil to a large pot over medium heat. Saute the garlic and onion until onions are yellow, approximately 5 minutes. Add water, bouillon, salt and pepper. Bring to boil, drop in cabbage and cook until cabbage wilts, approximately 10 minutes. Add tomatoes and stir constantly until flavours melt together.

Spaghetti Squash

This vegetable is cylinder shaped, weighs 2 to 4 kg and is pale ivory to pale yellow in colour. The skin is hard like a pumpkin.

As the name suggests the interior has spaghetti-like strands and can be substituted for pasta in any recipe.

The good news is that it is low in carbs and calories.

How to Cook:

Bake it – Pierce the whole shell several times and place in baking dish. Cook in preheated oven (190 degrees C) approximately 1 hour or until flesh is tender

Boil it – Heat a pot of water large enough to hold the whole squash. When the water is boiling, drop in squash and cook for 20 to 30 minutes. When a fork goes easily into the flesh, the squash is done.

Once squash is cooked, let it cool for 10 – 20 minutes so it is easier to handle, then cut in half.

Microwave it – Cut squash in half lengthwise, remove seeds. Place cut sides up in a microwave dish with ¼ cup water. Cover with plastic wrap and cook on high for 10 – 12 minutes. Add more cooking time if necessary. Let stand covered for 5 minutes.

Remove seeds, then pull a fork lengthwise through the flesh to separate it into long strands.

Spaghetti Squash Alfredo

1 medium size cooked squash
1 cup sour cream
½ cup shredded mozzarella cheese
¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 cloves garlic finely minced
¼ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon black pepper

In a medium size saucepan, combine all ingredients (except squash) over a medium-low heat and whisk until smooth and creamy, stirring constantly to prevent burning. Add the spaghetti squash strands and stir until thoroughly mixed and heated through. Serve immediately.

All for now – regards – Lorraine

Newsletter 89 – November 2010

Hi everyone 24/11/2010

Well, it is gorgeous here in Kapiti for the second consecutive day, and definitely summer is here. Christmas Day and New Years Day fall at the weekend this year so our delivery schedules are relatively unchanged. There will be normal Wednesday and Thursday deliveries the week prior to Christmas and delivery on Thursday 30th December and Thursday 6th January. Please let me know your requirements.

Spring greens are just starting to appear in the boxes – my box last week had a couple of courgettes and a garnish of spinach. I see green peas and new season potatoes on this weeks produce list so fingers crossed for some of these soon.

This edition includes a short report on the Wellington Vegetarian Food and Lifestyle Festival, and the featured vegetable is beetroot.

Wellington Vegetarian Food Festival

This was held in the St. Johns Convention Centre in Willis Street on Saturday 2nd October. It was a fine day and about 2000 people attended. There was much interest in our vegeboxes and lots of new people have tried the service. The Organic Connection draw for a free Baby Box delivery was won by Atom Emet and his son Solomon.

I didn’t get away from our display to visit other areas of the show but there was a real buzz and I understand lots of interesting healthy food, cooking demos, speakers and films.

Beetroot

Beetroot has been cultivated for about 4,000 years. It was probably the ancient Babylonians who started to use it first. Early Greeks and Romans used the root for its medicinal, properties and the leaves as vegetables.

Since Roman times beetroot juice has been considered an aphrodisiac. In mythology Aphrodite is said to have eaten beets to retain her beauty.

Beetroot is rich in minerals: potassium, phosphorus, sulphur, calcium, iodine, iron, manganese, chlorine, and copper as well as traces of the rare metals rubidium and caesium. Also vitamins B1, B2, niacin, B6, B12, C and beta carotene, flavonoids, natural sugar and a good quality and quantity of amino acids.

The health claims for this humble vegetable are staggering. It is said to be beneficial for everything from detoxification, to arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), blood pressure and varicose veins. Very good for liver and kidneys and has anti-tumour properties too.

Other studies have found positive effects of beetroot juice in human exercise and performance. Scientists found cyclists who drank a half litre of beetroot juice several hours before setting off were able to ride up to 20% longer than those who drank a placebo juice.

Here are some ideas for using this colourful vegetable.

For a revitalizing power juice.

Juice together 1 medium raw beetroot, 1-2 apples and 2-3 medium carrots.

Serve hot or cold

For a stunning colourful mash combine equal amounts of pureed or grated cooked beetroot with floury mashed potatoes, a generous dollop of butter, sour cream and seasoning.

Alternatively serve hot as a vegetable with sour cream, black pepper and a few sprigs of parsley.

Or chop beetroot raw into approximately 1″ cubes. Place in a baking dish and sprinkle with brown sugar, balsamic vinegar and olive oil. Bake till cooked. Awesome flavour!!

Apple Beetroot and Avocado Salad

3 medium beetroot
200g mixed salad leaves
1 red onion finely sliced
1 apple peeled, cored and thinly sliced
1 avocado peeled, stone removed and sliced

Dressing:

¾ cup apple juice
½ cup cider vinegar
½ cup vegetable oil
½ teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 teaspoon prepared mustard
¼ teaspoon celery salt

Preheat oven to 200 C. Wash beetroot and place in baking dish with 60 ml water. Cover and roast for 1 hour or until tender. Remove from oven and set aside to cool.

Whisk together the dressing ingredients.

Peel and slice the beetroot and combine with the dressing. Refrigerate for 20 minutes

Divide the salad leaves among four plates. Drain beetroot and reserve dressing. Arrange overlapping layers of beetroot, onion, apple and avocado on salad greens. Drizzle with dressing.

A gift idea. Instead of flowers send a box of organic fruit and veggies. We can put a greeting message on the label. The clients who have used this service say the feedback has been great

All for now

Regards – Lorraine

Newsletter 90 – December 2010

Hi everyone 13/12/2010

This is the last edition of The Organic Connection newsletter for 2010. We will cover holiday deliveries, a couple of recipes that could be useful to include in festive season feasts, and a Christmas cake recipe which is the easiest and most fullproof ever.

Thank you all for your support this year, a big welcome to all the new clients and a special thanks to the long standing clients who have been getting boxes either weekly or fortnightly for 6 or 7 years. A very special girl called today to advise holiday requirements and said she has been a client for 6 years, her lively 6 year old daughter was a tiny baby when she started getting boxes.

Newsletter 91 – January 2011

Hi everyone 14/01/2011

Hope you all had a wonderful Christmas. I had the pleasure of hosting a young Serbian lady called Kristina who was visiting N.Z. on her way home from a working holiday in Australia. We met on a train between Brisbane and Mooloolaba last year. Miss Molly and I holidayed at home this year, got lots of jobs done around home in a leisurely fashion and enjoyed the great weather.

This edition features onions, and gem squash

I would like to thank everyone for supporting The Organic Connection during 2010. Special thanks for referralls, feedback especially when something has gone awry, and supplying favourite recipes. Also thank you to the generous people who contributed to vegeboxes for the Downtown Community Centre.

Waitangi Day falls this year on a Sunday so while sadly there is no extra holiday, the good news is there is no disruption of deliveries

Gem Squash are now available . These small round green vegetables are not to be confused with round courgettes, Gems have a much harder skin which is plain dark green.

Gem Squash are much beloved by South Africans and if anyone would like a special order please advise urgently with an idea of the quantity in kilos.

Here are a few serving ideas gleaned over the years from South African lady clients.

Steam, boil, or microwave whole until soft (test with a skewer). Cut in half and scoop out the seeds.

Add salt, pepper and a knob of butter OR Fill with a mixture of butter, sugar and cream style sweet corn (quantities to taste). Sprinkle with grated cheese and grill in oven. OR Scoop out the flesh and mash with butter and sugar. OR Scoop out flesh and mash with butter, pepper and salt.

Very good for babies when mashed.

Onions

There are many varieties of onion differing in shape, size and colour. The onion family includes red, green, yellow, brown and and purple varieties, bunching onions, and spring onions, leeks and shallots.

The onion dates back to 3500 B.C. and while it may have been growing wild in every continent, it is believed to have originated in Asia.

The onion was worshipped by early Egyptians, eaten in large quantities by Greek athletes, and also became popular with the Roman culture.

Today onions are eaten regularly everywhere in the world and they are more than food, onions can help keep you healthy.

As a source of nutrients, they contain quercetin (a flavonoid, one category of antioxidant), vitamin C, potassium, dietary fibre, calcium and iron. They are claimed to be helpful in preventing artheriosclerosis, Cardiovascular disease, heart attack, stroke & osteoporosis.

Onions are mainly used to add flavour to savoury dishes and salads but when a huge pile built up in the cupboard, recipes using large amounts were needed.

Mrs Mays Onion Tart

Line a square or round dish with flaky pastry and partially cook.

Filling

3 large onions cut up fine
3 large eggs unbeaten
½ cup cream (or milk)
Butter, pepper and salt

Sautee onions with butter, pepper and salt until translucent. Cool onions. Add eggs, cream (or milk) and a dessert spoon of chopped or grated butter.

Mix with a fork and spoon mixture into pastry case.

Bake in a slow oven (150-160 degrees) until cooked.

Serve with new potatoes and salad.

(Mrs May was the mother of my best friend at school so it was fun to ring Gwen who now lives in Hokitika, to get this recipe and of course have a long chat)

French Onion Soup

12 large onions,
1 tablespoon sugar,
3 tablespoons oil,
3 tablespoons butter
1.5 litres beef stock, salt and pepper to taste.
French stick and grated cheese

Peel onions, cut in half and slice thinly. Add sliced onions to soup pot with oil, butter and sugar and cook over moderate heat stirring frequently until onions turn golden brown. This should take about 15 minutes.

Add stock to the soup pot and simmer for a further 30 minutes. Add brandy, salt and pepper to taste.

Slice bread into rounds and grill with plenty of cheese on top then add a round to each bowl.

Organic Supplements

I have access to a high quality organic based range of supplements as well as a protein powder which includes all 9 essentail amino acids. If you would like more information on these products please let me know

Best wishes for health, wealth, and success in all your endeavours during 2011

All for now

Regards

Lorraine

Newsletter 92 – April 2011

Hi everyone
19/04/2011
Hope you are all well and adjusting quickly to the change of season.
This newsletter is very overdue due in part to the computer self destructing and inbox disappearing along with my email lists. I now understand the wisdom of “backing up”. This edition of the newsletter covers a price increase, some information on a supplier of organic wines, and a recipe which I really enjoyed.
As I have had to rebuild the email newsletter list from scratch and I have no way of knowing if you have asked to be removed, my apologies if you need to request removal again.

NEW PRICES

Due to ever rising costs of fuel charges and the increased costs of growing fresh produce, plus a GST increase, regrettably I need to increase prices. I have had 4 different increases since March 2008 and can no longer sustain the current charges. New prices are effective week commencing 2nd May 2011

Baby Box $49
Standard Box $61
Family Pack $85

ORGANIC WINES

I have recently had the pleasure of buying several different wines from Celtic Winery. They are situated near Levin and are a fully certified organic fruit winery. Drinking these wines is a unique experience, great flavours, great strength and a lovely mellow aftertaste. While I claim no expertise in this area, I am happy to pay the premium price for these hand crafted additive free wines. If anyone is interested in home delivery please let me know and details on prices, minimum quantities etc will be supplied. Emma Van Veen is a Naturopath friend and I recently had lunch at her home. Her quiche was divine!

EMMA VAN VEEN’S QUICHE RECIPE

2-3 cloves garlic (crushed)
1 tsp dried basil
1 onion
1 tsp dried coriander
½ cup pumpkin seeds
1cup grated cheese
1 tspn capers
1 150g can salmon
6 eggs
½ cup milk
1 cup spinach finely sliced (or any other vegetable of your choosing)
1 tspn butter/coconut oil

Saute onion and garlic with butter/oil until clear, add basil, coriander and pumpkin seeds and cook for a further 1-2 minutes. In a bowl whisk the eggs, add the capers, salmon, milk, vegetables and onion mixture and stir until combined. Sprinkle with cheese . Place in oven proof casserole dish and bake at 180 degrees for approximately 30/40 minutes (until mixture is set in the middle)
Serve on own, or with side salad or vegetables. Great to eat hot or cold and freezes well

Anyone concerned about diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, ageing etc??
I have run into a health programme which is having great results for many people. If you would like more information please advise.

All for now – regards – Lorraine

Newsletter 93 – May 2011

Hi everyone 31/05/2011

Another stunning day – have just returned from taking Miss Molly for a walk.

Welcome to all the new clients who have started receiving boxes this year and thanks to everyone who has changed their AP in response to advice on the recent price increase.

This edition of the newsletter will include an update on the Downtown Community Centre fresh produce project and thanks to Anne White for two great sounding soup recipes. Featured vegetable is choko and there is some info available on a health programme which is having great results.

Downtown Community Centre Fresh Produce Project.

Since September 2008 we have been sending a regular standard box to this organisation to add a healthy and fresh component to their food parcels. The original idea was to find a core of people who would add $5 to their payment to fund a regular delivery. Some clients have also donated their box of produce instead of cancelling while on holiday.Thanks to all these generous donors both past and present. Anyone interested in being part of this project please let me know.

Choko

Choko is a native of Central America. They grow on a climbing plant and look a bit like a pale green pear. Chokos have a mild flavour similar to marrow or zucchini so are usually cooked with other stronger tasting foods. Store at 7-10 degrees C.

For home storage refrigerate in a plastic bag.

To cook cut choko in half and remove seeds. If boiling or steaming leave the skin on to retain flavour. Cook 15-20 minutes or until tender.

Ways to eat this vegetable.

Choko halves can be stuffed with all sorts of fillings – rice, bacon, tomato, onion, cheese and more. They can be used much like a zucchini, can be served with a sauce, added to casseroles and stir fries, used in desserts, tarts, breads, jams or cakes. They are also good in fruit and vegetable salads raw, can be pickled or used as a base for relishes.

Chokos are available from April to June and are a good source of Vitamin C.

Simple Vegetable Soup

2 medium onions
4 small carrots
2 medium potatoes
Celery salt
2-3 handfuls of barley

Peel and cube vegetables and sauté in 50 grams butter in 2 litre cast iron casserole dish. Add broccoli, zucchini, cabbage, capsicum, or whatever you have along with 1 tsp each of green herb and chicken stock powder, add water to nearly top of pot. Simmer gently for at least one hour. Season to taste.Puree half of soup and stir together with the rest.

Pumpkin Soup

2 tsp Maggi instant chicken stock
2 tsp Maggi instant green herb stock
1 kilo pumpkin
3 cups water
½ tsp nutmeg
2 tsp sugar
2 cloves garlic
2 onions
Milk or water

Cut pumpkin into several pieces, remove seeds, but leave skin on if hard to remove.Cook skin side down, in saucepan with water, seasonings and chopped onions and garlic for ½ to 1 hour until tender.Scrape flesh from the skin and puree veges with the cooking liquid, using food processor or sieve. Before serving re-heat adding milk, water, or cream to the required thickness

Healthpointe.

Anyone concerned about diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, ageing etc?? I have access to a programme which is having great results for many people. If you would like more information please let me know.All for now – regards – Lorraine

Hi everyone 31/05/2011

Another stunning day – have just returned from taking Miss Molly for a walk.

Welcome to all the new clients who have started receiving boxes this year and thanks to everyone who has changed their AP in response to advice on the recent price increase.

This edition of the newsletter will include an update on the Downtown Community Centre

fresh produce project and thanks to Anne White for two great sounding soup recipes. Featured vegetable is choko and there is some info available on a health programme which is having great results.

 

Downtown Community Centre Fresh Produce Project.

Since September 2008 we have been sending a regular standard box to this organisationto add a healthy and fresh component to their food parcels. The original idea was to find a core of people who would add $5 to their payment to fund a regular delivery. Some clients have also donated their box of produce instead of cancelling while on holiday.Thanks to all these generous donors both past and present.

Anyone interested in being part of this project please let me know.

Choko is a native of Central America. They grow on a climbing plant and look a bit like a pale green pear. Chokos have a mild flavour similar to marrow or zucchini so are usually cooked with other stronger tasting foods.

Store at 7-10 degrees C. For home storage refrigerate in a plastic bag.

To cook cut choko in half and remove seeds. If boiling or steaming leave the skin on to retain flavour. Cook 15-20 minutes or until tender.

Ways to eat this vegetable.

Choko halves can be stuffed with all sorts of fillings – rice, bacon, tomato, onion, cheese and more. They can be used much like a zucchini, can be served with a sauce, added to casseroles and stir fries, used in desserts, tarts, breads, jams or cakes. They are also good in fruit and vegetable salads raw, can be pickled or used as a base for relishes. Chokos are available from April to June and are a good source of Vitamin C.

Simple Vegetable Soup

2 medium onions
4 small carrots
2 medium potatoes Celery salt
2-3 handfuls of barley

Peel and cube vegetables and sauté in 50 grams butter in 2 litre cast iron casserole dishAdd broccoli, zucchini, cabbage, capsicum, or whatever you have along with 1 tsp each of green herb and chicken stock powder, add water to nearly top of pot. Simmer gently for at least one hour. Season to taste.Puree half of soup and stir together with the rest.

Pumpkin Soup

2 tsp Maggi instant chicken stock
2 tsp Maggi instant green herb stock
1 kilo pumpkin
3 cups water
½ tsp nutmeg
2 tsp sugar
2 cloves garlic
2 onions
Milk or water

Cut pumpkin into several pieces, remove seeds, but leave skin on if hard to remove.Cook skin side down, in saucepan with water, seasonings and chopped onions and garlic for ½ to 1 hour until tender.Scrape flesh from the skin and puree veges with the cooking liquid, using food processor or sieve.Before serving re-heat adding milk, water, or cream to the required thickness

Healthpointe.

Anyone concerned about diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, ageing etc?? I have access to a programme which is having great results for many people. If you would like more information please let me know.

All for now – regards – Lorraine

Newsletter 95 – September 2011

Hi everyone 15/09/2011

It seems a long time since I have composed a newsletter – and it is (apart from an emergency memo from a winter fairyland last month).

This edition will feature a couple of recipes, a soup which my neighbour Wendy dropped in (yes the same awesome lady who sent out the emergency memo last month), and a vege frittata which I haven’t tried yet but sounds a bit decadent.

Also some details of the Vegetarian Society Festival – The Organic Connection is having a stand again this year and it would be great to see any customers there.

And some snippets about other product lines which I have access to.

Vegetarian Society Festival

The Vegetarian Food and Lifestyle Festival will be held on Saturday October 1st at St. Johns in the City (corner Willis & Dixon Sts) from 10 a.m. to

4 p.m. $5 entry for adults or $10 for a family. There will be over 20 stall holders showcasing vegetarian and vegan cuisine, products and services, guest speakers, films and cooking demonstrations with special guest Rob Jacobs from televisions NZ Master Chef programme.

For more information go to www.vegetarianfestival.org.nz

Vegetable Frittata

Peel and cook 3 medium potatoes, 3 pieces of kumara and 3 of pumpkin (pieces all about the same size). Let cool slightly and cut into ½ cm slices.

Line a large heavy ovenproof dish with baking paper. Layer the cooked vegetables into the pan until they are all used. Top this with a bunch of silverbeet finely sliced and 1 ½ cups of corn kernels.

Whisk together 8 eggs, 2 cups of cream, 1 dessertspoon mustard and 1 teaspoon salt. Pour this mixture over the vegetables then top with ground pepper and cover generously with about 2 cups of grated cheese.

Bake in a low oven, 100 degrees celcius for 3 hours. Slow cooking will ensure the eggs don’t separate and get watery.

Curried Pumpkin & Kumara Soup

Cut up in similar size pieces an equal quantity of kumara and pumpkin (buttercup or butternut will do equally well). Add 2 medium onions sliced.

Make a chicken stock using 1 teaspoon stock powder (Maggi or similar) to 1 cup boiling water

sufficient to fill pan 30 or 40 cm above the veges.

Add pepper, salt and curry powder to taste.

Cook till veges are soft then blend until smooth.

For a really thick soup serve as is, or thin to desired consistency using milk or water.

Organic Wines

I have mentioned in a previous newsletter that we have access to additive free, fully certified organic fruit wines from Celtic Winery. Drinking these wines is a unique experience, great flavours, great strength, and a lovely mellow aftertaste.

If anyone is interested in home delivery please let me know and details on prices, minimum quantities etc. will be supplied.

Health Programme

Anyone concerned about diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, ageing, or just plain would like more energy??

I have run into a programme which is having great results for many people including me. If you would like more information please advise.

All for now – regards – Lorraine

Newsletter 96 – October 2011

Hi everyone 25/10/2011

What a great result for NZ in the R.W.C. and what an awesome international festival it has been. This edition of the newsletter (No. 96) will cover a report on the Vegetarian Society Festival, an idea to help Bees in NZ and some snippets about other product lines I have access to. Featured vegetable is asparagus.

The Vegetarian Society festival was again a great day. The weather was fine, there were lots of interesting stalls promoting and selling food and all things vegetarian, Sea Shepherd were there, a chiropractor, lots of cooking demonstrations and films. Also animal rights groups.

Our draw for a baby box of veges was won by Venise Cornfort. It was great to see existing clients there and to meet many new ones.

Asparagus

The name comes from a Greek word meaning “shoots” or “sprouts”. Asparagus is a perennial garden vegetable and a member of the lily family. Widely cultivated for its tender, succulent, edible shoots, asparagus was known more than 2000 years ago in the eastern Mediterranean region. Greeks appreciated asparagus for its unique flavour, texture and alleged medicinal qualities. They ate it fresh in the season and dried in winter.

Asparagus is an excellent source of folic acid, a good source of vitamin C, Thiamin (B1), Vitamin B6, and potassium. It is the highest testing food containing glutathione, one of the bodies most potent cancer fighters.

To store trim bottom end of spears and stand the asparagus in a plastic bag in an inch of water in the frig.

To cook take each spear by its end and bend gently. It will snap at approximately the point where tenderness begins. Reserve the stem ends for soup. Bring a large saucepan of salted water to the boil, drop in the asparagus spears, let water return to the boil and cook uncovered till tender.

Occasionally fish out a spear and bite to test. Cooking time will vary depending on thickness of spears and freshness.

If asparagus is to be served cold, remove from saucepan with tongs and drop into a bowl of iced water. This stops cooking and sets the bright green colour. This versatile vegetable can be served hot, or cold in a vinaigrette. It can also be included in an omelette, quiche or frittata, and makes a delicious soup.

Cream of Asparagus Soup

1/2 kilo asparagus cut into 2” lengths
1 onion chopped ½ cup cream
2 tablespoons each butter and flour
4 cups chicken stock
Salt and pepper to taste

Saute onion in butter for 3 minutes. Stir in flour and add chicken stock slowly. Add asparagus, cover, and simmer 20 minutes or until asparagus is tender. Puree until smooth.

Add cream, salt and pepper to puree and reheat.

Serves 4.

During my recent dog sledding expedition, I met a lady in the café at the Snow Farm who has done lots of exciting projects in wine and restaurants and is currently engaged in projects to ensure the bees of the world survive and prosper. Her name is Maureen Maxwell and she has recently become Regional President for the Oceania Commission of Apimondia (a Rome based international federation of beekeeping associations).

Bees need our help because:

The bee cannot survive without the help of humans, and we cannot survive without the bee.

More than 1/3 of what we eat and ¾ of the diversity relies on bee pollination and so do billions of $$$ in export earning.

Bees all around the globe are being critically threatened by Varroa, pesticides, disease and loss of habitat.

So, what can we as individuals do??

Establish a bee friendly plot in the garden. Maureen has available as a fund raiser for Help NZ Bees, a $5 packet of seeds called “Wild Flower Seed Rescue Remedy” These are available on line at www.wildforage.co.nz

I have my packet and a spot in the garden in mind.

Protein Powder

Are you and your family getting enough protein? Adults need approximately 1g per kilo of body weight daily. Vegetarians in particular need to be creative to ensure adequate protein intake. Protein powder added to a fruit smoothie, makes a fantastic breakfast.

Many of you are familiar with the soya and milk product and this has been my staple breakfast for a long time.

I am excited about the introduction of a protein powder specially formulated for vegetarians (100% plant based product made from soy, wheat and pea).

Please let me know if you are interested in either of these high quality products.

Health Programme

Anyone concerned about diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, ageing, or just plain would like more energy??

I have run into a programme which is having great results for many people including me. If you would like more information please advise.

All for now

Regards

Lorraine

 

Newsletter 94 – August 2011

THE ORGANIC CONNECTION

60A DONOVAN ROAD

PARAPARAUMU

042987377

Email lorraineupham@xtra.co.nz

www.organicconnection.co.nz

16th August 2011

Hi everyone,

For the past nine years I have arranged my life around getting the vege box orders done on time and giving the best customer service possible.

Last weekend I went on a major “bucket list” adventure- an over night dog sled trip over wild mountain trails at the Snow Farm (near Cardrona)

I was booked to fly home Monday in time to do the orders Monday and Tuesday night. Due to the major storm happening all over the country I am still here and now booked to travel home Wednesday night.

This will depend on the Lindis Pass road being open and Christchurch airport being open, so when mother nature rules who knows.After talking with the suppliers it seems that normal deliveries will be suspended this week, anyway due to harvesting and transport difficulties caused of course by the storm.

The purpose of this newsletter (which is being sent by my wonderful neighbour Wendy) is to advise that there will be no deliveries this week. My apologies for the inconvenience this will cause you all. I feel very bad for my part in this delivery failure-next time I go away I will take all necessary documents and technology with me.

All for now

Regards Lorraine

Newsletter 97 – November 2011

Hi everyone 24/11/2011

Hard to believe 2011 is nearly over and it has been a great one. Have ticked off lots of bucket list adventures – I hope you have too. The Organic Connection customer list continues to grow and I really appreciate all our loyal clients. While we endeavour to provide a good service, it is always great to get feedback and suggestions.

Items in this edition include holiday delivery dates, a healthy party snack platter, my usual rant about protein intake and health programme, plus a bit about the bees.

Christmas and New Year delivery dates

We are offering deliveries on Thursday 28th December, Thursday 4th January and deliveries return to normal week starting 9th January 2012.
Thanks to all who have advised their holiday plans. Everyone else please let me know if you need deliveries on the above dates or if you wish to cancel any deliveries.

Vegetable Platter

This makes a great change from carbohydrate loaded conveyances to carry dip to ones mouth (i.e. bread, chippies, crackers).
Slice raw celery, slice raw carrot, trim broccoli into florets which can be used either blanched or raw, and cauliflower florets are best blanched. Arrange in groups.
These make a colourful and tasty platter served with a creamy dip.

Bees in New Zealand need our help

Like many people I have been thinking about the part bees play in the food chain. I mentioned in my last newsletter that I had met a lady called Maureen Maxwell who is doing great things internationally and locally to ensure the bees of the world survive and prosper.

So what can we as individuals do??
Establish a bee friendly plot in the garden. Maureen has available as a fund raiser for Help NZ Bees, a $5 packet of seeds called “Wild Flower Seed Rescue Remedy”. These are available on line at www.wildforage.co.nz
I have my packet and thanks to everyone who has already ordered seeds. In fact what a great item to include with Christmas cards to special people.

Vegetarian Protein Powder

Humans need 1 gram of protein daily for each kilo of body weight. In all the questionnaires I have seen, it is rare to find someone who actually gets this amount daily. Vegetarians in particular need to be creative to ensure adequate protein intake and this new protein powder made from soy, wheat, and pea is perfect for the job.

Health Programme

Is anyone else wondering how the swimming togs will look this summer. I am hard out to lose a pesky 5 kg, 2 ½ gone, 2 ½ to go. The programme has the side effect of being great for health and energy. Anyone want to join me?

All for now,
regards Lorraine